Local Real Estate Professional Recognized for Million-Dollar Successes

Irma Yapor with Real Property International has earned the Million Dollar Guild (GUILD) Recognition® owned by The Institute for Luxury Home Marketing®. The GUILD recognition is awarded to residential real estate professionals performing in the million-dollar and above market.

The Million Dollar Guild® recognizes those residential real estate professionals who have demonstrated their experience and proficiencies in working with the affluent customer. The Institute only awards the recognition to professionals who have provided verified and notarized documentation of performance reflecting sales in the top 10% of their given market and above the million-dollar threshold.

“Real Estate professionals who have earned admittance to The Institute’s Million Dollar Guild® have specific upper-tier market knowledge, understand the unique needs of affluent buyers and sellers and are experts in their respective markets,” said Amanda Hammer, Director of Membership at The Institute. “Whether you’re buying or selling a multi-million dollar property, you can depend upon The Institute’s Million Dollar Guild® members to have the competencies necessary to help you meet your objectives.”

“To have this recognition of my accomplishments in serving Windermere is an honor,” said Yapor. “I love my community and its residents, but above all is about serving my clients the best way possible, putting their best interest first.”

Irma Yapor has been in real estate since 2006 and specializes in luxury homes and new construction in Windermere, Orlando, Montverde and surrounding areas in Florida. She’s broker-owner of the fast growing real estate brokerage Real Property International. Irma Yapor is also a Certified International Property Specialist and has received numerous awards and recognitions, including the 2014 Emerald Elite Award and Real Trends 2015 Best Real Estate Agents in America.

For insights into the current state of the luxury market in Florida, contact Irma Yapor at Real Property International at 407-909-8000 or email mail@realpropertyinternational.com.

For more information about The Institute for Luxury Home Marketing, the Certified Luxury Home Marketing Specialist® designation, or the Million Dollar Guild Recognition®, visit www.luxuryhomemarketing.com.lm  or email info@luxuryhomemarketing.com.

https://www.newswire.com/news/local-real-estate-professional-recognized-for-million-dollar-successes-18178936 

Lakefront Mansion for sale in Keene’s Pointe, Windermere

Extraordinary French Country Estate on the Butler Chain of Lakes in desirable Keene’s Pointe, Windermere, FL. Spanning over 7800 SF, this magnificent waterfront residence welcomes you to an elegant living area with a dramatic focal point of the tropical salt water pool surrounded by waterfalls and fire features, and the stunning lake views. This amazing Rick Watson custom-built mansion is in pristine condition and no detail has been spared, with over $750k in quality-crafted updates and upgrades, including the amazing rear exterior from the lanai to the lake, travertine and wood floors throughout, large sliding pocket glass doors bringing the outside in, new laundry room with double washer/dryers, summer kitchen, and so much more. You’ll never notice the size of this large Estate due to its outstanding layout, bringing a feeling of coziness and gravitating all living areas towards the heart of the home. Enjoy morning breakfasts by the lake and late dinners by the resort-style pool. Just minutes to ‘A’ rated schools, shopping, dining and Disney theme parks. Don’t settle for less – live life the way it should be.

Visit 6037Greatwater.com for more photos and details.

Contact Irma Yapor at 407-909-8000 to schedule your private showing today!

Home for Sale in Keene’s Pointe, Windermere

Homes for sale in Keenes Pointe

Home for Sale in Keene’s Pointe, Windermere

BEST VALUE IN KEENE’S POINTE. Wonderful and well-maintained home with three bedrooms, three baths, plus office/den in exclusive Keene’s Pointe gated golf community. This is the perfect vacation or retirement home featuring an open layout, triple split plan, with large family room, tray ceilings, crown moldings and French doors that open to a beautiful glassed-in Florida room overlooking the professionally landscaped back yard with a 6-foot waterfall. Gourmet kitchen has cherry wood, granite countertops, planning desk and breakfast bar overlooking the family room. Appliances include double wall oven, gas cooktop, microwave, refrigerator and dishwasher. Spacious master suite with sitting area features his and her walk-in closets, bath with dual sinks, large shower and garden tub. Secondary bedrooms have a bathroom to service each. Other features include volume ceilings, crown molding, tray ceilings, French doors and irrigation well keeping water costs to a minimum. Guard-gated community offers private country club with recreation clubhouse, restaurant, fitness center, tennis courts and community pool.

For more details CLICK HERE.

For an appointment, please contact Irma Yapor at 407-909-8000.

How do I buy a house?

6 must-do’s before buying a home
By Dana Dratch • Bankrate.com
 

You might be ready to buy a home, but are you armed with the knowledge you need? Do you know about credit score requirements? Are you familiar with flexible standards on Federal Housing Administration loans?

Whether you are a first-time homebuyer or an experienced owner, buying a house requires a “preflight check,” in the words of Barry Zigas, director of housing policy for the Consumer Federation of America.

Here is a six-item checklist, including tips on two types of savings you need, plus advice about what’s more important than buying a house for its resale value.

1. Strengthen your credit score

“It’s a brave, new world with respect to credit requirements for mortgages,” says John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education at smartcredit.com and formerly of FICO, which pioneered credit scoring.

One old rule still applies: The higher your credit score, the lower your down payment and monthly payments.

“Below 660 or 680, you’re either going to have to pay sizable fees or a higher down payment,” Zigas says. And that’s pretty much the cutoff score for getting a mortgage, he says.

Vicki Bott, deputy assistant secretary for single-family housing at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, says that her office has noticed much the same thing. “While there are many qualified borrowers in the 580 range, the market today is probably (looking for) 640 to 660, at a minimum,” Bott says.

On the other end, a score of 700 to 720 will get you a good deal and 750 and above will garner the best rates on the market, Ulzheimer says.

Improve your chances by: pulling your credit reports and ensuring you’re not being unfairly penalized for old, paid or settled debts, Zigas says.

Stop applying for new credit a year before you apply for financing. And keep the moratorium in place until after you close on your home, Ulzheimer says.

2. Figure out how much house you can afford

The buyer’s mantra: Get a home that’s financially comfortable.

There are various rules of thumb that will help you get an idea of how much home you can afford. If you’re using FHA financing, as almost one-fifth of buyers get FHA-insured loans, your home payment can’t exceed 31 percent of your monthly income. But, with some mitigating factors, FHA will let you go higher.

For conventional loans, a safe formula is that home expenses should not exceed 28 percent of your gross monthly income, says Susan Tiffany, director of consumer periodicals for the Credit Union National Association.

For a rough assessment of how much house you can afford, check out Bankrate’s new house calculator.

Improve your chances by: trying on that financial obligation long before you sign the mortgage papers, says Tiffany. Before you home shop, calculate the mortgage payment for the home in your intended price range, along with the increased expenses (such as taxes, insurance and utilities). Then bank the difference between that and what you’re paying now.

Not only does it allow you to build a nice nest egg, but “you can back away from it,” or scale back, if the payments start to pinch, she says.

3. Save for down payment and closing costs

Depending on your credit and financing, you’ll typically need to save enough money to put anywhere from 3.5 percent to 20 percent down.

If you’re using FHA financing, then you need a score of 500 or higher. And in the 500 to 579 range, if you can find a lender, you’ll have to put 10 percent down instead of 3.5 percent.

One exception: Veterans Affairs loans, which require no down payment.

Another cash expense: closing costs. Whatever your loan source, you’ll also need money to pay closing costs, which run (depending on where you live), from $2,300 to $4,000. Get the average closing costs in your state at Bankrate’s closing costs map.

Improve your chances by:Along with banking your own money, search out down payment assistance, Tiffany says. Often it’s location-based or tagged to a certain type of buyer, like first-timers, she says. So do an Internet search with the city name, then the county name, along with word combinations such as “down payment assistance,” “first-time homebuyers” and “homebuyer’s assistance.”

In a buyer’s market, you can also negotiate to have the seller pay a portion of the closing costs.

4. Build a healthy savings account

This is over and above your money for the down payment and closing. Your lender wants to see that you’re not living paycheck to paycheck. If you have three to five months’ worth of mortgage payments set aside, that makes you a much better loan candidate. And some lenders and backers, like the FHA, will give you a little more latitude on other factors if they see that you save a cash cushion.

That money will also help you with maintenance and repair issues that come up when you own a home. While repairs are sporadic, items such as a new roof, water heater or other big-ticket items can hit suddenly and hard.

Improve your chances by: setting aside money every month. A good rule of thumb: on average you’ll spend 2.5 percent to 3 percent of your home’s value annually on upkeep, repairs and maintenance, says Joseph Gyourko, chairman of the real estate department at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. If you’re buying a $250,000 home, aim to bank $520 to $625 per month.

5. Get preapproved for a mortgage

For serious home shoppers, “the No. 1 thing is they better have everything in order,” says Dick Gaylord, past president of the National Association of Realtors. That means that, before the real home shopping begins, you want to get financing in place, he says.

And the preapproval process is “much more extensive” than it was a few years ago, he says.

Bott agrees. “That documentation around income and assets is very essential, more so than in the last five years,” she says.
Improve your chances by: getting financing in place “before you walk through the first house,” Gaylord says. Otherwise, he says, “How do you know how much you can afford?”

6. Buy a house you like

If you’re buying today for yourself and your family, you want a home that will make you happy for the next few years.

Gone are the days when you could count on a quick sale, Tiffany says. And depending on how much you put down, and how much you have to shell out to sell and relocate, short-term ownership can be a pretty expensive proposition.

Improve your chances by: stepping back, Gyourko says, and making certain “you like the house.”

 

Read more:http://www.bankrate.com/system/util/print.aspx?p=/finance/mortgages/6-must-dos-before-buying-a-home-1.aspx&s=br3&c=mortgage&t=story&e=1&v=1#ixzz3AqF0KQUI

FICO credit score changes may mean higher credit scores for many consumers

Changes are coming to FICO, a broadly used credit score, that may mean higher credit scores for many consumers. Banks, credit card issuers, auto lenders and other businesses use those scores to decide whether to lend to consumers and how much interest to charge them. A higher score could get you better terms on loans for cars and homes.

What are the changes?

Fair Isaac Corp., the company behind FICO, says there are three significant changes to its metric, which it says is used in 90 percent of U.S. consumer lending decisions.

  • Debts that go to collections agencies and get repaid won’t count against a consumer’s FICO score.
  • Medical debts will have a smaller effect on the score. If your only major bad mark comes from unpaid medical debts, FICO says it expects your credit score to go up by 25 points. (Scores range from 300 to 850.)
  • A technique will analyze people’s creditworthiness if they don’t have much of a credit history.

Why are the changes happening?

Regulators have focused on health care debts. In May, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), a government agency, said consumers may be penalized too harshly for medical debt. The CFPB said medical bills are different from some other types of debts because they can be more expensive, unpredictable and caused by disputes between medical providers and insurers instead of bills consumers simply didn’t pay.

The CFPB said that consumers who owe medical debt may have their credit scores underestimated by about 10 points.

Who will be most affected?

Greg McBride, the chief financial analyst for financial services company Bankrate, says the change will help many consumers, but it won’t make a big difference if you already have bad credit or very good credit. For consumers with medical debt, this could be the difference between a decent score of around 675 and a good one around 700, or a good score and a great one around 725.

According to a study by the Urban Institute, 35 percent of Americans have debts and unpaid bills reported to collection agencies. The Association of Credit and Collection Professionals says health care-related bills account for about 38 percent of the debt that gets collected.

As for the new technique focused on those with little or no credit history, McBride says its effect remains to be seen. He says lenders want to get a better read on such consumers because they see them as potential customers and want to know which are likeliest to repay loans. The technique will help lenders evaluate people who don’t have a bank account, mortgage or credit card – often those with lower incomes, including young people and retirees.

When do these changes go into effect?

Fair Isaac hopes lenders will use the newest version of FICO, which will be available in the fall. But lenders don’t have to buy the updated version.

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